Foods to decolonize your pantry (via decolonize your diet on facebook)

A few weeks ago, a student asked what items should be in a “starter” decolonized pantry.

Here’s my first attempt at a list of what we always try to have in stock:

Dried beans (of many varieties)—either organic or locally grown
Quinoa (Locally grown, if possible) or Amaranth
Raw local honey
Organic Masa Harina (or fresh masa, if available)
Dried organic posole
Mesquite Flour
Raw Cacao Powder
Chia Seeds
Pumpkin Seeds
Sunflower Seeds
Pecans or Brazil Nuts or Peanuts
Currants
Dried Chiles (Anchos, Chiltepin, NM, etc)
Safflower Petals (seasoning for soups and stews)
Sea Salt
Pink Peppercorns
Dried Mexican Oregano
Coconut oil
Grade B Maple Syrup
Lemon Verbena Tea
HIbiscus Flowers

Fresh Foods:
Nopales
Seasonal Berries (Frozen if not in season)
Greens (quelites and verdolagas)
Squash (Winter and Summer, depending on season)
Corn (fresh or frozen, depending on the season)
Sweet Potato
Potatoes
Onions
Garlic
Tomatoes (Canned if not in season)
Fresh seasonal chiles
Papaya or Pineapple or other seasonal fruit like guavas
Eggs (to be native they can be from Quail, Turkeys, or Araucana hens eggs)
Seasonal local mushrooms

Non-Native ingredients we like to have on hand:
Cilantro
Cumin Seeds
Coriander Seeds
Cinnamon Sticks (Ceylon)
Greens: Spinach, Kale, Swiss Chard, Arugula
Carrots
Cabbage

What we eat with these ingredients:
Meals: beans, corn tortillas, tlacoyos, sopes, pupusas, vegetarian tacos, vegetarian enchiladas, soups, and stews.
Snacks: Nuts, seeds, and currents.
Drinks: Fruit Smoothies with chia seeds, Nut milk smoothies with mesquite, Aguas Frescas, Lemon Verbena Tea, Hibiscus Tea

roadsandkingdoms
roadsandkingdoms:

In the U.S., “hibachi” has come to mean any kind of Japanese grill, but in Japan, grills come in many shades, from round clay shichirin to the more general konro cooking stove. They’re all best powered by hot-burning, crazy clean, very expensive oak binchōtan charcoal, but even the lower-end charcoal we used on for a cookout on the shores of Hokkaido’s Lake Onuma will do nicely. It still burns 3x hotter than U.S. charcoal, and gets out of the way of the flavor of the true stars here: blackening shishito, browning pork, purpling squid #rkjapan

roadsandkingdoms:

In the U.S., “hibachi” has come to mean any kind of Japanese grill, but in Japan, grills come in many shades, from round clay shichirin to the more general konro cooking stove. They’re all best powered by hot-burning, crazy clean, very expensive oak binchōtan charcoal, but even the lower-end charcoal we used on for a cookout on the shores of Hokkaido’s Lake Onuma will do nicely. It still burns 3x hotter than U.S. charcoal, and gets out of the way of the flavor of the true stars here: blackening shishito, browning pork, purpling squid #rkjapan